That’s a Wrap: Farewell, George Romero

I spent my Sunday watching home haunt documentaries, that I fully intended to write-up on Vespertine House this evening. At some point in the last one I watched, I found myself rolling my eyes at yet another zombie-themed haunt. 

I then had a moment of reflection on the modern-day zombie renaissance we’ve had the last few years. It seems that everywhere you look there are zombies. 

We see them shambling out of the Halloween and Horror niches and into everyday life. They’ve invaded our television sets, music, fashion, games– even quirky bumper stickers have a booming zombie-loving demographic. Ultimately I shook my head and murmured “people and their fucking zombies”.

Of all days to have such a thought, it had to be the day that the father of the modern-day zombie passed away.


From what started as Barbara’s screams in an old cemetery in 1968, and ended with another Trixie virus outbreak in 2010, George Romero proved again and again that he could orchestrate zombie fear amongst the masses with the utmost finesse. 

Romero adapted the zombie creature and its origins to fit a more modern-day audience. His concept was far removed from the original Voodoo zombie seen in classic Horror films like “I Walked With a Zombie”. His formula has stood the test of time as it’s applied in the majority of the zombie Horror we see today. 

   
I’m happy to say that I learned a lot about good cinema from watching his films. I also learned that it’s good to not be serious about everything all the time and that you can absolutely serve up your Horror with a side of fun. 

It’s with a sad keystroke that I say goodbye to yet another film legend. But I’m happy to know that he will never be forgotten.

        
So, the next time a zombie shuffles across a silver screen or a protagonist nervously discovers that a strange virus is bringing the dead back to life, smile and think of George. His greatest gift is the incredible Horror legacy that he’s left us with.

💜

-Sarah

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That’s a Wrap: Farewell, Wes Craven

Earlier this evening I scrolled through Facebook, flinching every time a MTV Video Music Award article appeared. As I gave up looking for actual news updates, I clicked on the icon that appeared showing that new stories had trickled in. Before leaving my app and closing my folio, I glanced and saw the headlines:

Wes Craven, Horror Movie Maestro, Dies at 76

The steady flow of air in my lungs was suddenly interrupted and my heart sank. I couldn’t believe it.

I still can’t believe it.

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Wes Craven’s passing this evening has left me purely saddened. It’s the very same melancholy haze that lingers when you lose someone you love.

I have no connection to Wes Craven- we’ve never even met- but I can’t help but feel heartbroken over his passing as he had such a profound impact on my life.

Wes Craven created some of the things that make me happiest today, and he is solely responsible for my love of horror films.

His signature style can be distinguished immediately in all his films. He was edgy, cool, and had such a polished aesthetic that every up-and-coming director could learn from. Scream was my first romantic spree with genuine horror and it was Craven’s lasting impression that still resonates with me, and so many others, today.

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The horror community will have a dismal day as they say farewell to a seminal cinematic figure.

In light of this, I do hope that you find the time to read about the great Wes Craven or watch one of his many classic films. I really think he would love knowing that our send off to him comes in the form of us experiencing the thrills he so beautifully orchestrated on the silver screen for so many years.💜

Thank you, Wes, for all the nightmares and screams you shared with us. You’ll be missed.

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💔

-Sarah